Food Photography

Capture the most delicious moments of your life.
Photo by Broma Bakery

COLLABORATOR SPOTLIGHT

Learn more about the social stars shooting with an OM-D.

Sarah Fennel

@bromabakery | Over 95k followers

“Composition is the key to standing out as a food photographer. It is not enough to take photos of beautiful things. You have to take photos that draw on classical artistic conventions in order to enticingly capture the universality that is food. That, and be sure to photograph as much chocolate as possible.”

I’m Sarah Fennel and I’m a professional food photographer and baker. My blog, Broma Bakery, is a testament to my love of food! I’ve been profiled in national websites and publications and my photographs have appeared in magazines, restaurants, and cookbooks. My clients include Sur La Table, Ghirardelli, Chobani, Absolut Vodka, Blue Diamond, Google and Wolf Gourmet. I’ve also started the online Foodtography School where people can learn the technical and business aspects of food photography.

FOLLOW SARAH’S TIPS AND TECHNIQUES TO CREATE TASTY FOOD PHOTOS

1 Shooting with Aperture Priority Mode works best for me. A wide aperture is crucial to get amazing shots of food, so I tend to use a setting of F4.5 or wider. This helps to create a shallow depth of field so the food pops off the photo.

2 It’s important that my photos have consistent look and feel. One way to achieve this consistency is to use the same focal length for each shoot. Once I set the focal length, I try not to change it.

3 The OM-D E-M10 Mark III shoots remarkably well in low light situations. I’m not afraid to bump up the ISO to get a crisp shot. The camera’s built-in image stabilization system ensures shots taken in dim light look amazing.

4 Composition is important. Always make the food the hero of your photograph. Stay away from props and complicated backgrounds that take someone’s focus off the food you’re photographing.

5 If you’re just getting started, try shooting food with lots of texture, like a grain bowl, loaded salads, or layered sandwiches. They look great when shot from above. Stay away from food like pizza or enchiladas that look appetizing for only five minutes and then not so much.

6 A camera like the E-M10 Mark III gives you plenty of control over your image. When I shoot, I always choose the lowest possible ISO setting (100 to 200), the widest aperture possible (typically F2.8 to F4.5), and then set the shutter speed accordingly.

View more of Sarah's secrets to success in this interview. SEE SARAH’S PHOTOS ON INSTAGRAM

TIPS FOR GREAT FOOD PHOTOS

Check out all of the latest foodie-centric tips in our Learn Center.

 

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JOIN OUR LIST & GET MORE PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS!

Get tips for taking delicious food photos, savings to help you get new gear, and more.

  • CAPTURE YOUR BEST FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

    Colors, textures, composition – for amazing food images, all of these things are important. Something else that helps? Step up from smartphone photography to the OM-D E-M10 Mark III. This OM-D makes it easy to shoot and share your very best images. The compact size is convenient to take along, while the simple to use tilting screen and touch menu controls let you quickly frame unique angles and customize settings. Use Silent Mode to silence all camera noises, perfect for discreet shooting in quiet places. And with the E-M10 Mark III’s built-in Wi-Fi, you can wirelessly upload and share your images with friends and followers before you leave the restaurant.

  • CAPTURE YOUR BEST FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

    Colors, textures, composition – for amazing food images, all of these things are important. Something else that helps? Step up from smartphone photography to the OM-D E-M10 Mark III. This OM-D makes it easy to shoot and share your very best images. The compact size is convenient to take along, while the simple to use tilting screen and touch menu controls let you quickly frame unique angles and customize settings. Use Silent Mode to silence all camera noises, perfect for discreet shooting in quiet places. And with the E-M10 Mark III’s built-in Wi-Fi, you can wirelessly upload and share your images with friends and followers before you leave the restaurant.

MEET UP WITH OLYMPUS

We can talk about cameras, lenses, and the best brunch spot in town!

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OLYMPUS FAMILY SPOTLIGHT

Our colleagues don't just talk the talk, they walk the walk.

Ted Colegrove

Graphic Designer and Olympus team member for 8 years

“I’ve always loved food and photography, so as a photographer, the marriage of the two has been very creatively satisfying.”

I’m Ted Colegrove and I love to eat. Coincidentally, I also love to take photos, so the marriage of the two has been very creatively satisfying. I never thought of myself as a photographer until I joined the Olympus family, now I am a published freelance photographer. My style of food photography is similar to a journalistic approach. I don’t spend hours dressing up my food with the perfect lighting and plating. I take photos of how the food was served, in the place it was served, as I’m about to eat it. Hopefully my love of food and photography inspires you to capture your edible adventures...before you eat them!

CHECK OUT TED'S TIP

MORE APPETIZING TIPS FROM THE OLYMPUS TEAM

1 Try composing your table layout as a vertical frame using the near/far approach. The turkey, ham or roast should be about in the center of the frame. Put something colorful and interesting in the lower part of the frame—no mashed potatoes or rolls—vegetables, salad, or cranberry sauce.

2Keep the composition tight and use a short zoom-in. Remember, you don’t have to show an entire dish. People will know it is round or oval even if you cut the bottom third out.

3Avoid clutter, but include accessories that make sense. Always light the candles. If there is a floral centerpiece, position it to the back of the image, where its busyness and color won’t compete with the food. If there is a liquid in the shot, gently blow some air into it through a straw to create a few bubbles on the surface near the rim of the container to make the surface more interesting.

4If there is a glass of wine in the shot, lightly moisten a piece of tissue and stick it to the back of the glass so that you can’t see the edges of the tissue from the front. This will prevent the glass from acting like a lens and pulling in everything in the background, and will make red wines look less black.

Want more Food Photography tips? Check out our full menu of food related articles.

GEAR TO HELP YOU GET THE SHOT

Check out our top lens picks that pair with the E-M10 Mark III to capture the most savory shots.

M.ZUIKO 25MM F1.8

(50mm in 35mm equivalent)

This compact prime lens is ideal for creating beautiful three-dimensional images with soft defocused backgrounds. Its fast f1.8 aperture makes the most of low light indoor settings.

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M.ZUIKO 30MM F3.5 MACRO

(60mm in 35mm equivalent)

This lightweight macro lens makes it easy to capture fine details for impactful artistic images. Its ultra-close minimum working distance of 14mm provides great flexibility for framing your shots.

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M.ZUIKO ED 60MM F2.8 MACRO

(120mm in 35mm equivalent)

This high quality weatherproof macro lens boasts fast and silent focusing, perfect for shooting up close in quiet environments. The bright aperture offers excellent low light performance.

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M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 14-42MM F3.5-5.6 EZ

(28-84mm in 35mm equivalent)

This ultra-slim zoom is ideal for everyday convenience. It extends and retracts automatically, making your E-M10 Mark III easy to carry and discreet for restaurants.

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